FAQs

Temple Greenways – FAQs2018-09-04T17:12:41+00:00

Harbour Walkway

Yes, the Harbour Walkway has been designed to be accessed by all users. All ramps will be DDA compliant, safety hand railing will be provided and the finished surface will be flat and non-slip.
Yes, the Harbour Walkway has been designed to be accessed by all users. All ramps will be DDA compliant, safety hand railing will be provided and the finished surface will be flat and non-slip.
Yes, the Harbour Walkway has been designed to be accessed by all users. All ramps will be DDA compliant, safety hand railing will be provided and the finished surface will be flat and non-slip.

Yes, cyclists will be able to cycle on the Harbour Walkway. However, as is required for all shared use areas, all users must look out for one another. During busy periods, it is recommended that for safety to all it would be more suitable for cyclists to push their bikes for this stretch.

No, we believe that it is not appropriate to provide segregation on the Harbour Walkway. This new route is to be provided as a shared use path which is accessible to all users.
The handrail height is proposed at 1.4m which is per standard guidance.
The Harbour Walkway will reduce the navigable channel within this area of the Floating Harbour and there will be a particular impact to the tunnel under the Temple Meads Viaduct. However, with a minimum useable width of approx. 11m through the tunnel this will be sufficient for the marine vessels that regularly operate in this area of the Floating Harbour. If a larger vessel is required to use this area of the Floating Harbour, which would be very infrequently, they would need to coordinate with the Harbour Master’s Office to use the other tunnel with care.
Currently the design is based on a light source from the pontoons.
An ecology study has been completed and has confirmed that there are no bats or other wildlife living in the tunnel. However, an ecologically sensitive area outside of the tunnel, but within the project area, has been identified and the design has considered this to ensure no disturbance to this area.

Cattle Market Road

Before being made eastbound only, Cattle Market Road had been closed to through traffic since June 2014 and therefore traffic that used to use this route would have already found an alternative route. There are a number of alternative routes for motor vehicles and the choice of route is dependent on their origin and destination. A traffic study was completed, which confirmed that the change would not have a significant impact on traffic flows.

The former Royal Mail Sorting Office on Cattle Market Road was acquired by Bristol City Council in 2015, and it was has since been announced as the site of the University of Bristol’s new Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus. This is the largest derelict site in the area and it is hoped that it will be a catalyst for further development.

Our proposals have focused on the protection of existing ecology and encouraging it to develop and flourish.

Yes, some trees were removed. However, these will be replaced with more ecologically appropriate species which will be identified through the development of tree planting strategy.

The routes will be suitably lit and CCTV installed to improve safety and security within this area. This will improve further with the future development within the area.